Blog

Starting Clinical Placements – What to know


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Here are 3 things you should know before you venture into the practical world of clinical medicine. If you’re already on the wards/theatres/etc., it’s not too late – this will still help!

  1. You are a valuable member of the team! It’s easy to feel insignificant on a busy ward, ward round, clinic or theatre. But remember you are a valuable member of the team! With this thought at the back of your mind, stir up the courage to approach a member of staff (it doesn’t always have to be a doctor) and let them know who you are and what you want to do. E.g. “Hello, My name is Leo/Liz, I am a medical student in my third year. I will be spending the morning with the doctors and learning on the cardiology ward round. How can I help and get stuck in?” You will be pleasantly surprised with the responses you will receive.

 

  1. Be early, not on time, but early. Getting to your location 10-15 minutes early keeps you calm and prepared. You’ll also notice that, just because you arrived several minutes earlier, you will have greater learning opportunities.

 

  1. Remember it is a learning process; you are in a safe and perfect environment to learn from highly skilled professionals and kind patients. You will not be an expert at lumbar punctures, diagnosing aortic stenosis, taking a history or examining a patient on the first day! These are skills you will learn and continue to master throughout medical school and even after you start working as a doctor. Do not be too hard on yourself, enjoy it.

Medics’ Inn

Blog

Creating A Poster


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Have a read of our top 4 tips when creating a poster for a conference, meeting, seminar, etc. We have also created a simple sample poster using PowerPoint, click to here download for free.
  1. Include the basics: title (+/- subtitle), author(s), introduction, method, results, discussion, conclusion, references.

  2. Colours: keep it simple, your poster should not include more than 3 different colours. Blue and white are great colours i.e. motorway sign colours. Also, green and red colour blindness are the most common form of colour blindness, so try to avoid putting these together on a slide or graph.

  3. Declutter, ‘less is more’; make sure your poster can easily be ready from 1-2 meters away.

  4. Opinions; share your poster with friends, family, mentors, junior and senior doctors. Get their opinion and advice.

 

Medics’ Inn

Blog

Making Contact With The Nigerian Embassy


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If you are medical student studying at a Medical School outside of Nigeria (and do not possess a Nigerian passport) it is important you contact the Nigerian Embassy to be aware of the cost of a visa application and the documents required. It is important to do this many months in advance of your elective to avoid disappointment.

To help, we have provided a letter you can download and edit to send to the Nigerian Embassy in your residing country. Making Contact With The Nigerian Embassy (download)

We have included some links below.

 

Nigerian Embassy Australia (link)

Nigerian Embassy Brazil (link)

Nigerian Embassy France (link)

Nigerian Embassy India (link)

Nigerian Embassy Ireland (link)

Nigerian Embassy Italy (link)

Nigerian Embassy Malaysia (link)

Nigerian Embassy Singapore (link)

Nigerian Embassy Spain (link)

Nigerian Embassy UK (link)

 

Blog

Accommodation Accommodation Accommodation


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You may find that throughout medical school, you may live in more than 10 different locations over your 4-6 years of medical study. This may be because the location of each medical speciality placement vary and require students to move around. Or, it could just be part of the university or college experience, as your friendship groups change, so does your home! This can sometimes be a daunting, overwhelming, lonely or simply annoying experience. Other than the practical issues of landlords, deposits, contracts and finances, here are a few suggestions to make your experience more pleasurable:

  1. When possible, have a look at what the accommodation of the coming year anticipates. Be aware of the location (town/city), travelling options and costs, onsite facilities, duration of accommodation stay, local attractions (restaurants, supermarkets/food stores, museums, etc). Knowing what to expect can help!
  2. Bring along 2-3 personal items that can transform a bland, impersonal, lonely room to your personal resting place, i.e. photographs, posters, cds/dvds, dumbbells, cushion, bedroom gown/house coat, etc
  3. New places often bring an unfamiliar scent, which are not always pleasant! Candles are a great tool for candle lovers, otherwise a plug-in air freshener will do. For those interested in candles, Yankee Candles are amazing but with a student budget, these may be too costly – so why not make your own!? Here is a link to a DIY candle tutorial you may find helpful: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U29HxuJQie0
  4. Remember it’s a phase. The hustle of medical school is just a phase, and this includes the hassle of moving from accommodation to accommodation. Also use this opportunity to get to know your new neighbours and environment!
Blog

2015 – Our Highlights


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As 2015 trickles into the past and 2016 creeps over the horizon, let’s celebrate 2015 by sharing our highlights of the year!

  1. The Launch of Medics’ Inn on Monday 31st August 2015!
  2. Our Top Posts:
  1. Our First Elective Report: Adepero Ajayi – Medical Elective In Nigeria
  2. Our New Logo
  3. Our Stats!

Here at Medics’ Inn, we are very grateful for your community and are looking forward to the future. We anticipate exponential growth, greater engagement with our online community and greater discoveries.

Many thanks

Medics’ Inn

Blog

Graduate Medicine? What to consider


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Are you thinking about studying medicine as a second degree or as a mature student? Here are 3 things to definitely consider!

 

1.Money!

All over the world, obtaining a medical degree is not cheap! So the wise thing to do would be to count the cost first before you embark on this journey!

Tuition fees? Living costs? Travel costs? Books, resources, etc? Can you really afford to study medicine for 4-5 years?

Medical schools provide a variety of financial support for mature students, there are also many organisations and charities that could provide financial support. The important issue is to be fully aware of the financial responsibility of your decision and how this may have an impact on yourself and those around you. It would be a horrible thing, to leave the medical programme because of insufficient funds.

 

2.Be sure

Be sure a career in medicine is what you truly desire. Healthcare experience before your application is essential, but as well as this, have a real good look at the life of a junior doctor in your country. Is this the kind of working life you want? The hours? Team dynamics? Career trajectory?

(Keep in mind, aspects of professional practise may change by the time you qualify as a doctor.)

Know what you’re getting into.

 

3. Be open-minded and connected

Sometimes, being a mature student amongst 18 year olds or 20 year olds can bring a sense of failure or insecurity when in fact it is a strength. You have previous experience in higher education, a degree, life experiences, a career etc. Be open to meeting new people, you will soon find out, students are unbothered about the fact that you have done a previous degree or are several years their senior, because in reality everyone is starting at the same level – year 1 of medical school. Also, it may help to connect with other mature or graduate students, a problem shared is a problem halved (most of the time).

 

If you would like to study medicine as a second degree or as a mature student please leave your questions and comments below. You can also contact us privately with your questions.

If you are currently studying medicine as your second degree, or have ‘been there, done that, got the t-shirt and the debt that goes with it’, please share your experiences below for someone else to be enlightened!

Medics’ Inn

Blog

Hard Work


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A subtle change in a phrase will change your outcome.

 

For one to succeed, one must work hard – this is a misunderstanding.

The word hard suggests the anticipated task is difficult, tough or problematic. Although, we may just be playing around with a thesaurus, let’s use the word challenge instead. The word challenge suggests the anticipated task is a trial, test or experiment that hopes to yield success, growth, development and change. Sometimes, a subtle change in a phrase will change your mindset. A subtle change in your mindset will change your actions. A subtle change in your actions will change your outcome.

Try using the word diligent instead, diligent means, showing careful and persistent work or effort.

Diligent Work.

 

A subtle change in a phrase will change your outcome.

 

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