Blog

Creating A Poster


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Have a read of our top 4 tips when creating a poster for a conference, meeting, seminar, etc. We have also created a simple sample poster using PowerPoint, click to here download for free.
  1. Include the basics: title (+/- subtitle), author(s), introduction, method, results, discussion, conclusion, references.

  2. Colours: keep it simple, your poster should not include more than 3 different colours. Blue and white are great colours i.e. motorway sign colours. Also, green and red colour blindness are the most common form of colour blindness, so try to avoid putting these together on a slide or graph.

  3. Declutter, ‘less is more’; make sure your poster can easily be ready from 1-2 meters away.

  4. Opinions; share your poster with friends, family, mentors, junior and senior doctors. Get their opinion and advice.

 

Medics’ Inn

Blog

Making Contact With The Nigerian Embassy


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If you are medical student studying at a Medical School outside of Nigeria (and do not possess a Nigerian passport) it is important you contact the Nigerian Embassy to be aware of the cost of a visa application and the documents required. It is important to do this many months in advance of your elective to avoid disappointment.

To help, we have provided a letter you can download and edit to send to the Nigerian Embassy in your residing country. Making Contact With The Nigerian Embassy (download)

We have included some links below.

 

Nigerian Embassy Australia (link)

Nigerian Embassy Brazil (link)

Nigerian Embassy France (link)

Nigerian Embassy India (link)

Nigerian Embassy Ireland (link)

Nigerian Embassy Italy (link)

Nigerian Embassy Malaysia (link)

Nigerian Embassy Singapore (link)

Nigerian Embassy Spain (link)

Nigerian Embassy UK (link)

 

Blog

Accommodation Accommodation Accommodation


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You may find that throughout medical school, you may live in more than 10 different locations over your 4-6 years of medical study. This may be because the location of each medical speciality placement vary and require students to move around. Or, it could just be part of the university or college experience, as your friendship groups change, so does your home! This can sometimes be a daunting, overwhelming, lonely or simply annoying experience. Other than the practical issues of landlords, deposits, contracts and finances, here are a few suggestions to make your experience more pleasurable:

  1. When possible, have a look at what the accommodation of the coming year anticipates. Be aware of the location (town/city), travelling options and costs, onsite facilities, duration of accommodation stay, local attractions (restaurants, supermarkets/food stores, museums, etc). Knowing what to expect can help!
  2. Bring along 2-3 personal items that can transform a bland, impersonal, lonely room to your personal resting place, i.e. photographs, posters, cds/dvds, dumbbells, cushion, bedroom gown/house coat, etc
  3. New places often bring an unfamiliar scent, which are not always pleasant! Candles are a great tool for candle lovers, otherwise a plug-in air freshener will do. For those interested in candles, Yankee Candles are amazing but with a student budget, these may be too costly – so why not make your own!? Here is a link to a DIY candle tutorial you may find helpful: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U29HxuJQie0
  4. Remember it’s a phase. The hustle of medical school is just a phase, and this includes the hassle of moving from accommodation to accommodation. Also use this opportunity to get to know your new neighbours and environment!
Blog

2015 – Our Highlights


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As 2015 trickles into the past and 2016 creeps over the horizon, let’s celebrate 2015 by sharing our highlights of the year!

  1. The Launch of Medics’ Inn on Monday 31st August 2015!
  2. Our Top Posts:
  1. Our First Elective Report: Adepero Ajayi – Medical Elective In Nigeria
  2. Our New Logo
  3. Our Stats!

Here at Medics’ Inn, we are very grateful for your community and are looking forward to the future. We anticipate exponential growth, greater engagement with our online community and greater discoveries.

Many thanks

Medics’ Inn

Blog

Graduate Medicine? What to consider


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Are you thinking about studying medicine as a second degree or as a mature student? Here are 3 things to definitely consider!

 

1.Money!

All over the world, obtaining a medical degree is not cheap! So the wise thing to do would be to count the cost first before you embark on this journey!

Tuition fees? Living costs? Travel costs? Books, resources, etc? Can you really afford to study medicine for 4-5 years?

Medical schools provide a variety of financial support for mature students, there are also many organisations and charities that could provide financial support. The important issue is to be fully aware of the financial responsibility of your decision and how this may have an impact on yourself and those around you. It would be a horrible thing, to leave the medical programme because of insufficient funds.

 

2.Be sure

Be sure a career in medicine is what you truly desire. Healthcare experience before your application is essential, but as well as this, have a real good look at the life of a junior doctor in your country. Is this the kind of working life you want? The hours? Team dynamics? Career trajectory?

(Keep in mind, aspects of professional practise may change by the time you qualify as a doctor.)

Know what you’re getting into.

 

3. Be open-minded and connected

Sometimes, being a mature student amongst 18 year olds or 20 year olds can bring a sense of failure or insecurity when in fact it is a strength. You have previous experience in higher education, a degree, life experiences, a career etc. Be open to meeting new people, you will soon find out, students are unbothered about the fact that you have done a previous degree or are several years their senior, because in reality everyone is starting at the same level – year 1 of medical school. Also, it may help to connect with other mature or graduate students, a problem shared is a problem halved (most of the time).

 

If you would like to study medicine as a second degree or as a mature student please leave your questions and comments below. You can also contact us privately with your questions.

If you are currently studying medicine as your second degree, or have ‘been there, done that, got the t-shirt and the debt that goes with it’, please share your experiences below for someone else to be enlightened!

Medics’ Inn

Blog

Hard Work


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A subtle change in a phrase will change your outcome.

 

For one to succeed, one must work hard – this is a misunderstanding.

The word hard suggests the anticipated task is difficult, tough or problematic. Although, we may just be playing around with a thesaurus, let’s use the word challenge instead. The word challenge suggests the anticipated task is a trial, test or experiment that hopes to yield success, growth, development and change. Sometimes, a subtle change in a phrase will change your mindset. A subtle change in your mindset will change your actions. A subtle change in your actions will change your outcome.

Try using the word diligent instead, diligent means, showing careful and persistent work or effort.

Diligent Work.

 

A subtle change in a phrase will change your outcome.

 

Share your thoughts with us.

Elective Reports

Adepero Ajayi – Medical Elective – Lagoon Hospital, Apapa, Nigeria


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Name: Adepero Ajayi

Hospital: Lagoon Hospital, Apapa, Nigeria

Elective Period: March 2015

Specialities: General Medicine & Surgery, Emergency Medicine/Paediatrics and Obstetrics & Gynaecology

Duration: 4 weeks

We started our rotation from Medicine > Surgery > Pediatrics/Emergency medicine > Obstetrics & Gynecology.

I would like to share about the hospital environment before I talk about the practice, if I take specific interest in discussing some issues and they seem normal to you, it is because in my school things are not particularly done that way and I appreciated that it was done with such seriousness in another practice.

The hospital environment was welcoming, everyone was practically happy to see you, always greeting regardless of who you are.

For medicine posting, we joined the ward-rounds and attended clinics, took vitals and answered a million and one questions. Many Nigerians are hypertensive and diabetic, we should watch it! I didn’t like the consultant we were assigned, so my first week wasn’t pleasant and I contemplated stopping but thanks to Ba’ami who encouraged me to continue and asked me to stop if my second posting was like that.

I resumed for the second week with fingers crossed, I’m glad I didn’t stop. They carried out at least ten procedures daily and the surgeons were excited to impact knowledge. We observed right hemicolectomy, several colonoscopy, osteotomy, hernioraphy, spinal fixture, gastroscopy, hysterectomy, endoscopy, knee replacement etc.  It was sad we missed the open-heart surgeries done before we started the posting.
Everyone was very cautious of infection control, zero tolerance for any wrong act. Procedures were well explained to patients before it was done; patients were assured if they were anxious in the sweetest way ever. Everything needed for the surgery was inside the theatre, no need to run anywhere in search of what wasn’t lost in case of any emergencies.

The manner in which the patients were addressed was also something that thrilled me, such courtesy and manner of approach. At this point, anyone might want to say, “It’s because it’s a private hospital.” I beg to differ, the federal and state hospitals are meant to be better, if a private owned organization can offer that what is the excuse of the government. It is possible and that I know as two of my colleagues shared their experience in other hospitals in Africa.

The emergency room was well managed and organized, everyone alert for an emergency case. We clerked and managed patients at ER. Something that thrilled me beyond measure was the maintenance system of the hospital, which is the major reason for the dilapidating state in our hospitals. Any complaints were addressed immediately no matter how negligible it was. The cleaners were always cleaning and the toilets were always clean, ensuring toilet rolls were available.

Adepero Ajayi and colleague

The kitchen was another interesting part of our stay, there was no monopoly of food type and I must say kudos to the chef, my heart was at ease knowing whatever I was eating was well prepared and perfectly healthy for me. The quality of food was very good, Sike and Nonso can testify to that. The chef was also friendly; he made us food sometimes on demand.

Here I was commending the staff of Lagoon Hospital Apapa, then I attended the clinical seminar on Ethics and I was blown away with the fact that they were not relenting on the standard already created but striving for more. How beautiful! I’m used to grand rounds were patient cases are discussed but never one in which the vision, principles and values of the hospital are engraved in the heart of the staff. iCARE an acronym for Integrity, Compassionate, Attentiveness, Respect and Excellence represents the values of the organization which every member of staff must uphold at every point.

The use of electronic medical report (EMR) system was fantastic, absurd we still use case-notes, what happens if they got burnt, huh? The EMR has patients record from whenever they registered. Tests are done and results gotten as soon as possible, minimal stress on patients and doctors with the use of intercom. This makes patient care faster and more efficient.

Adepero Ajayi and colleages

The doctors are very friendly and they took us tutorials. Another part of the experience I enjoyed was when they ask Sike and I for our names,
“I am Ajayi.”

“What about you?”

“I am Ajayi.” Epic moment! The drama that follow is usually amusing, they give the look of ‘you guys must be joking’ we give the look of ‘we bad like that’. Lol

I was happy I met Dr Dayo, Oni, Henry, Onabanjo, Anniebuna; and Dr Bukola who saved me the day I had diarrhea, I wish you all the best.

Obstetrics and Gynecology posting was good, here we met another Ajayi. We joined during the consultations at the clinic, examined patients, observed several caesarian sections, hysterectomy etc . There is something about Ajayis and O&G.

Doctor Ajayi was so pleasant; he was my best consultant there. Dr Akinniranye was such a peace loving man, teaching with such gentleness in the intensive care unit and high dependency unit, Dr Onakoya was very interesting too, I wouldn’t forget Blount’s disease for a long time that’s if I’ll ever forget. I haven’t had my neurosurgery posting yet but Dr Ojo was willing to explain the procedure of spinal fixture to us in his usual gentle manner. Dr Jimi Coker is a man of excellence, Sike said she will rather call him Prof, so Prof Jimi Coker, this man touched my being with the way he took his job and addressed everyone under him, surgeon extraordinaire. Although we meet Dr Abudu on the last day of our rotation, explaining how he was going to do the knee replacement to us was enlightening, one of us had the opportunity to watch because of infection control, and he wanted as few people in the theatre as possible.

Two other things I noticed, the bed cover was changed for each patient in the clinic and you sanitize your hand after every contact with patients, even if all you did was give an instrument used for a patient. Hand sanitizers were all over the walkway.

I’m grateful for this opportunity as I have honed my clinical skills and have a broader view of medicine as a profession, special thanks to God for journey mercies this past few week especially when the bus we boarded collided with a trailer on the bridge. For meeting this amazing people, I’m honoured.

Adepero Ajayi

Have a look at Adepero Ajayi’s full post on: https://perryztot.wordpress.com/2015/02/21/my-electives-experience/