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Blog, Elective Reports, Medical Elective

Successful Separation of Conjoined twins at University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Nigeria


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A team of UATH doctors on Tuesday successfully separated a set of conjoined twins at University of Abuja Teaching Hospital Gwagwalada. Dr Olori Samson, one of the surgeons who carried out the operation, said the parents visited the hospital on June 11 following a referral from another hospital.

 “On their arrival at our facility on June 11, 2018, having been referred from St. Mary Catholic Hospital, Gwagwalada where they were delivered through a Caesarean section, there were different hurdles. But the first hurdle was not on the surgery day but during the pre-surgery days. That is, making sure the babies were kept alive, which we delicately addressed.

“The other hurdles were anticipated based on our findings because after the initial clinical assessments, there were several CT scan investigations to determine the organs that were joined. So, we discovered their livers were joined. We had five sessions of all the teams coming together to plan and determine the best approach. We had anticipated the bleeding that would take place because the liver is one organ that you can’t really tie. So, the hospital management provided some modern gadgets we deployed to make sure the surgery went well. It did go well as we contained the surgery of about five hours. With what we had available to us, we hadn’t any fear that we would succeed in getting to the root of separating these babies,” Mr Samson said.

 Speaking at a press conference in Abuja on Friday, the Chief Medical Director (CMD) of UATH, Bisallah Ekele, said the babies are in good condition. “As we speak, today (Friday) is the fourth-day post-surgery. The babies are stable and in good conditions. We took a decision as to when the operation would be done considering the fitness of the babies and on 29th October, we went to theatre and after four and half hours, the corrective surgery was done,” he said.

He said the surgery was carried out by two teams of paediatric surgeons, a team of plastic surgeons, two teams of anaesthetics, and specialist nurses.

The father of the twins, Ferdinand Ozube, said he is grateful for the assistance and care rendered to his family by the Hospital in its trying moment. He said he had heard about and watched conjoined twins on television but never thought he would have them. 

Blog

Millennium Park, Abuja


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Millennium Park Abuja is the largest public park in Abuja covering, approximately 32 hectares. It is located in the Maitama district of the federal capital territory. The Millennium park was designed by he Italian architect Manfredi Nicoletti,commissioned in December 2003 by Queen Elizabeth II.

Its a lovely place for bird watching, a picnic, walks, jogging, other outdoor and group activities.

Photo Credit: Travel Start Blog

Tourism

Abuja Arts and Craft Village


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This is definitely a spot to visit while on your elective in Abuja or Gwagwalada. After shopping at the at Shoprite in the Central Business District, Abuja, I visited the Abuja Arts and Craft Village, just few minutes walk away.

There are many beautiful authentic, hand crafted jewellery items, small furniture items, baskets, mats, sculptures, pottery, paintings, other art pieces and fashion items which vary in price. This is a great spot to buy for holiday souvenirs and gifts for your loved ones at home. Definitely bring your A game and be ready to bargain!

Written by Wumi Oworu

Medical Elective

Staying Safe – Vaccinations & Antimalarials


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Most medical schools or hospitals have clear guidelines on the vaccinations they expect their students or employees to have received. Therefore I would advise you to look at the guidelines of the medical school/hospital/other medical environment you belong to and those of your desired elective location.

I’d advise the following vaccinations: Cholera, Diphtheria, Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, Meningococcal Meningitis, Poliomyelitis, Rabies, Tetanus, Typhoid, Yellow Fever (Yellow Fever certificate is required at the airport and will need to be shown at passport control)

There are a variety of anti-malarials available, some more specific for Nigeria, its important you receive advice from a doctor or pharmacist before making a purchase. Make sure you are fully aware of the course for the specific antimalarial you have chosen, side effects and drug interactions if you are taking other medication.

Once you know what antimalarial you would like to buy consider buying the generic medication rather than the brand name – this will save you money! You can also calculate the exact number of tablets you need (included before and after travel needs) so you won’t have left over medication.

It may also be helpful for you to purchase some anti-emetics, anti-diarrhoeal, simple analgesia (such as paracetamol) and antihistamines. Getting diarrhoea within the first few days of arriving in Nigeria because your GI system is getting used to the pepper, leaf soups and heat is not the best welcome gift!!

Other resources (mostly relevant to the UK, so please look for the equivalent for your country):

If you have any medical or mental health conditions, seek medical advice from your local doctor before making any definitive plans or payments towards your Nigerian elective.

All medications should be purchased after a medical consultation and with a prescription. All medications should be used as prescribed by your medical practitioner.

Blog

Equipment For Your Elective


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We have put together a list of items to consider for your elective.

  • White coat
  • Disposable gloves
  • Plastic aprons
  • Face mask (with visors)
  • Antiseptic hand scrubs
  • Liquid plaster
  • Theatre shoes
  • Stethesscope
  • Accommodation essentials: bedding, mosquito net, insect repellent, antibacterial hand wipes

Think carefully about the following questions in respect to your purchases:

  1. Can I guarantee the hospital/clinic/etc will be able to provide me all my protective wear for the duration of my elective?
  2. Does the speciality I am working in require these items? Is it a surgical specialty? Is it community based?
  3. Could I just buy a few items to manage for the first week or 2, then stock up when I get there?
  4. Will I be working outdoors?