medical placement

Blog, Elective Reports, Medical Elective

Successful Separation of Conjoined twins at University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Nigeria


No Comments

A team of UATH doctors on Tuesday successfully separated a set of conjoined twins at University of Abuja Teaching Hospital Gwagwalada. Dr Olori Samson, one of the surgeons who carried out the operation, said the parents visited the hospital on June 11 following a referral from another hospital.

 “On their arrival at our facility on June 11, 2018, having been referred from St. Mary Catholic Hospital, Gwagwalada where they were delivered through a Caesarean section, there were different hurdles. But the first hurdle was not on the surgery day but during the pre-surgery days. That is, making sure the babies were kept alive, which we delicately addressed.

“The other hurdles were anticipated based on our findings because after the initial clinical assessments, there were several CT scan investigations to determine the organs that were joined. So, we discovered their livers were joined. We had five sessions of all the teams coming together to plan and determine the best approach. We had anticipated the bleeding that would take place because the liver is one organ that you can’t really tie. So, the hospital management provided some modern gadgets we deployed to make sure the surgery went well. It did go well as we contained the surgery of about five hours. With what we had available to us, we hadn’t any fear that we would succeed in getting to the root of separating these babies,” Mr Samson said.

 Speaking at a press conference in Abuja on Friday, the Chief Medical Director (CMD) of UATH, Bisallah Ekele, said the babies are in good condition. “As we speak, today (Friday) is the fourth-day post-surgery. The babies are stable and in good conditions. We took a decision as to when the operation would be done considering the fitness of the babies and on 29th October, we went to theatre and after four and half hours, the corrective surgery was done,” he said.

He said the surgery was carried out by two teams of paediatric surgeons, a team of plastic surgeons, two teams of anaesthetics, and specialist nurses.

The father of the twins, Ferdinand Ozube, said he is grateful for the assistance and care rendered to his family by the Hospital in its trying moment. He said he had heard about and watched conjoined twins on television but never thought he would have them. 

Blog

Medical School Can Be Tuff


No Comments

Medicine is similar to other professions is many ways, but it is also different from other professions in many more ways. The hustle of medical school is like no other undergraduate course. As well as studying for a degree, you have begun your training for the career. Your career starts now.

You have now adopted a culture where juggling numerous extracurricular activities is the norm; you turn down more social events than you’d like; your term/semester begins with, is interrupted by or end with 1-3 assessments or exams! The list goes on. Only other medical students/student doctors understand this way of life. Although your family and friends are very proud of you, there is an air of disappointment. Even though you try to explain the structure of your course, the emotional demands, the time constraints, your goals and aspiration, “they just don’t get it”.

But remember you are not alone on this journey, there are hundreds of students just like you in the country, and there are thousands of students around the world in your position (some worse off). Stay true to your convictions and try to maintain a healthy balance of things. Know your priorities. Remember, medical school is but for a season; how you handle medical school is an indicator of how you will handle life as a doctor.

Medics’ Inn

Blog

My Clinical Experience So Far


No Comments

I really enjoyed the experience of working in a clinical environment. I was excited because it felt unreal, I’d fought hard to get into medical school and I was potentially standing in the environment I would be working in in the near future. It gave me that extra encouragement from time to time when I doubted if being a doctor is the right profession for me. A lot of the time it did make me upset, I spoke to a lot of people who suffered with chronic illnesses and the description of their physical and emotional pain made me feel down. A lot of what I thought about medicine came from the media; there are also times when the doctor has to tell family members of their recent loss. Speaking to someone who describes their chronic pain really hits home how emotionally draining this profession will be and medical school can be. In a way it has taken me from childhood to adulthood, my faith also. There is so much pain and suffering in the world, it reinforces my belief that God really has a plan.

Photo Credit: PhotoPin

Anonymous

Year 1 Student Doctor

Blog

Accommodation Accommodation Accommodation


No Comments

You may find that throughout medical school, you may live in more than 10 different locations over your 4-6 years of medical study. This may be because the location of each medical speciality placement vary and require students to move around. Or, it could just be part of the university or college experience, as your friendship groups change, so does your home! This can sometimes be a daunting, overwhelming, lonely or simply annoying experience. Other than the practical issues of landlords, deposits, contracts and finances, here are a few suggestions to make your experience more pleasurable:

  1. When possible, have a look at what the accommodation of the coming year anticipates. Be aware of the location (town/city), travelling options and costs, onsite facilities, duration of accommodation stay, local attractions (restaurants, supermarkets/food stores, museums, etc). Knowing what to expect can help!
  2. Bring along 2-3 personal items that can transform a bland, impersonal, lonely room to your personal resting place, i.e. photographs, posters, cds/dvds, dumbbells, cushion, bedroom gown/house coat, etc
  3. New places often bring an unfamiliar scent, which are not always pleasant! Candles are a great tool for candle lovers, otherwise a plug-in air freshener will do. For those interested in candles, Yankee Candles are amazing but with a student budget, these may be too costly – so why not make your own!? Here is a link to a DIY candle tutorial you may find helpful: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U29HxuJQie0
  4. Remember it’s a phase. The hustle of medical school is just a phase, and this includes the hassle of moving from accommodation to accommodation. Also use this opportunity to get to know your new neighbours and environment!
Elective Reports

Adepero Ajayi – Medical Elective – Lagoon Hospital, Apapa, Nigeria


4 Comments

Name: Adepero Ajayi

Hospital: Lagoon Hospital, Apapa, Nigeria

Elective Period: March 2015

Specialities: General Medicine & Surgery, Emergency Medicine/Paediatrics and Obstetrics & Gynaecology

Duration: 4 weeks

We started our rotation from Medicine > Surgery > Pediatrics/Emergency medicine > Obstetrics & Gynecology.

I would like to share about the hospital environment before I talk about the practice, if I take specific interest in discussing some issues and they seem normal to you, it is because in my school things are not particularly done that way and I appreciated that it was done with such seriousness in another practice.

The hospital environment was welcoming, everyone was practically happy to see you, always greeting regardless of who you are.

For medicine posting, we joined the ward-rounds and attended clinics, took vitals and answered a million and one questions. Many Nigerians are hypertensive and diabetic, we should watch it! I didn’t like the consultant we were assigned, so my first week wasn’t pleasant and I contemplated stopping but thanks to Ba’ami who encouraged me to continue and asked me to stop if my second posting was like that.

I resumed for the second week with fingers crossed, I’m glad I didn’t stop. They carried out at least ten procedures daily and the surgeons were excited to impact knowledge. We observed right hemicolectomy, several colonoscopy, osteotomy, hernioraphy, spinal fixture, gastroscopy, hysterectomy, endoscopy, knee replacement etc.  It was sad we missed the open-heart surgeries done before we started the posting.
Everyone was very cautious of infection control, zero tolerance for any wrong act. Procedures were well explained to patients before it was done; patients were assured if they were anxious in the sweetest way ever. Everything needed for the surgery was inside the theatre, no need to run anywhere in search of what wasn’t lost in case of any emergencies.

The manner in which the patients were addressed was also something that thrilled me, such courtesy and manner of approach. At this point, anyone might want to say, “It’s because it’s a private hospital.” I beg to differ, the federal and state hospitals are meant to be better, if a private owned organization can offer that what is the excuse of the government. It is possible and that I know as two of my colleagues shared their experience in other hospitals in Africa.

The emergency room was well managed and organized, everyone alert for an emergency case. We clerked and managed patients at ER. Something that thrilled me beyond measure was the maintenance system of the hospital, which is the major reason for the dilapidating state in our hospitals. Any complaints were addressed immediately no matter how negligible it was. The cleaners were always cleaning and the toilets were always clean, ensuring toilet rolls were available.

Adepero Ajayi and colleague

The kitchen was another interesting part of our stay, there was no monopoly of food type and I must say kudos to the chef, my heart was at ease knowing whatever I was eating was well prepared and perfectly healthy for me. The quality of food was very good, Sike and Nonso can testify to that. The chef was also friendly; he made us food sometimes on demand.

Here I was commending the staff of Lagoon Hospital Apapa, then I attended the clinical seminar on Ethics and I was blown away with the fact that they were not relenting on the standard already created but striving for more. How beautiful! I’m used to grand rounds were patient cases are discussed but never one in which the vision, principles and values of the hospital are engraved in the heart of the staff. iCARE an acronym for Integrity, Compassionate, Attentiveness, Respect and Excellence represents the values of the organization which every member of staff must uphold at every point.

The use of electronic medical report (EMR) system was fantastic, absurd we still use case-notes, what happens if they got burnt, huh? The EMR has patients record from whenever they registered. Tests are done and results gotten as soon as possible, minimal stress on patients and doctors with the use of intercom. This makes patient care faster and more efficient.

Adepero Ajayi and colleages

The doctors are very friendly and they took us tutorials. Another part of the experience I enjoyed was when they ask Sike and I for our names,
“I am Ajayi.”

“What about you?”

“I am Ajayi.” Epic moment! The drama that follow is usually amusing, they give the look of ‘you guys must be joking’ we give the look of ‘we bad like that’. Lol

I was happy I met Dr Dayo, Oni, Henry, Onabanjo, Anniebuna; and Dr Bukola who saved me the day I had diarrhea, I wish you all the best.

Obstetrics and Gynecology posting was good, here we met another Ajayi. We joined during the consultations at the clinic, examined patients, observed several caesarian sections, hysterectomy etc . There is something about Ajayis and O&G.

Doctor Ajayi was so pleasant; he was my best consultant there. Dr Akinniranye was such a peace loving man, teaching with such gentleness in the intensive care unit and high dependency unit, Dr Onakoya was very interesting too, I wouldn’t forget Blount’s disease for a long time that’s if I’ll ever forget. I haven’t had my neurosurgery posting yet but Dr Ojo was willing to explain the procedure of spinal fixture to us in his usual gentle manner. Dr Jimi Coker is a man of excellence, Sike said she will rather call him Prof, so Prof Jimi Coker, this man touched my being with the way he took his job and addressed everyone under him, surgeon extraordinaire. Although we meet Dr Abudu on the last day of our rotation, explaining how he was going to do the knee replacement to us was enlightening, one of us had the opportunity to watch because of infection control, and he wanted as few people in the theatre as possible.

Two other things I noticed, the bed cover was changed for each patient in the clinic and you sanitize your hand after every contact with patients, even if all you did was give an instrument used for a patient. Hand sanitizers were all over the walkway.

I’m grateful for this opportunity as I have honed my clinical skills and have a broader view of medicine as a profession, special thanks to God for journey mercies this past few week especially when the bus we boarded collided with a trailer on the bridge. For meeting this amazing people, I’m honoured.

Adepero Ajayi

Have a look at Adepero Ajayi’s full post on: https://perryztot.wordpress.com/2015/02/21/my-electives-experience/

Blog

Medical School in Nigeria – A Small Comparison


1 Comment

The traditional format of medical school in the UK, is quite similar to medical school in Nigeria.

On average, a medical degree requires 6 years of undergraduate study of Medicine. First year is in the Faculty of Science, students study the basic sciences i.e. Biology, Physics and Chemistry. In second and third year, students go on to learn anatomy, physiology and biochemistry. The remaining 3 years are spent in the clinical environment at a Teaching Hospital for students to be taught General Surgery, Pathology, Paediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, etc…

Most often, there are 4 important written exams, these are commonly referred to as MB exams. One occurs at the end of the second year, one after the fourth year, one after the fifth year and the last exam after the sixth year.
This is a simplified overview of undergraduate medical education in Nigeria, variations are expected between medical schools.

Please comment below with your suggestions and questions, or contact us directly.

Blog

Fully Accredited Medical Schools and Approved Teaching Hospitals in Nigeria


4 Comments

It can be difficult to know which teaching hospitals and medical schools to consider for your medical elective. Always conduct a thorough search into your institution in Nigeria and confirm with your medical school your chosen location meets their requirements.

Here are some suggestions of where to start when organising you elective in Nigeria.

 

“The Medical and Dental professions in Nigeria are regulated by the Medical and Dental Practitioners Act Cap 221 (now Cap M8) Laws of Federation of Nigeria 1990 which sets up the Medical and Dental Council of Nigeria with the following mandates:

  1. Regulation of training in Medicine, Dentistry and Alternative Medicine in Nigeria
  2. Regulation of Medical, Dental and Alternative Medicine practice in Nigeria.
  3. Determination of the knowledge and skills of these professionals.
  4. Regulation and control of Laboratory Medicine in Nigeria.”

 

Cited March 2015

Sources:

https://www.mdcn.gov.ng/

http://www.mdcnigeria.org/Internship%20Training%20Centres.htm

 

Fully Accredited Nigerian Medical Schools

 

  1. College of Health Sciences, Abia State University Uturu, Abia State
  2. College of Health Sciences, University of Uyo, Akwa Ibom
  3. College of Health Sciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Nnewi, Anambra State
  4. College of Medical Sciences, University of Maiduguri, Borno State
  5. College of Medical Sciences, University of Calabar, Cross – Rivers State
  6. College of Health Sciences, Delta State University, Abraka, Delta State
  7. College of Health Sciences, Ebonyi State University Abakaliki, Ebonyi State
  8. College of Medical Sciences, University of Benin, Benin-City, Edo State
  9. College of Health Sciences, Igbinedion University Okada, Edo State
  10. College of Medicine, Ambrose Alli University Ekpoma, Edo State
  11. College of Medicine, University of Nigeria Enugu Campus, Enugu State
  12. College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi- Araba, Lagos State
  13. College of Medicine, Lagos State University Ikeja, Lagos State
  14. Obafemi Awolowo College of Health Sciences, Olabisi Onabanjo University Ago Iwoye, Ogun Sate.
  15. College of Health Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo University Ile-Ife, Osun State.
  16. College of Medicine, Enugu State University of Science & Technology, Enugu, Enugu State
  17. College of Medicine, Imo State University Owerri, Imo State
  18. Faculty of Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Kaduna State.
  19. Faculty of Medicine, Bayero University Kano, Kano State
  20. College of Medicine, University of Ilorin, Kwara State
  21. College of Health Sciences, Bingham University Karu, Nasarawa State
  22. College of Health Sciences, Niger Delta University, Wilberforce Island, Bayelsa State
  23. College of Health Sciences, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Osun State
  24. College of Health Sciences, Usmanu Danfodio University Sokoto, Sokoto State
  25. College of Health Sciences, Madonna University Elele, Rivers State
  26. College of Health Sciences, University of Port- Harcourt, Rivers State
  27. College of Health Sciences, Benue State University, Makurdi, Benue State
  28. College of Health Sciences, Anambra State University, Uli Anambra State
  29. Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Jos, Plateau State
  30. College of Health Sciences, Bowen University, Iwo, Osun State
  31. College of Health Sciences, Babcock University, Ilisham-Remo, Ogun State
  32. College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Oyo State

 

 

Approved Nigerian Teaching Hospitals

 

  1. Abia State University Teaching Hospital, Aba
  2. University of Uyo Teaching Hospital
  3. Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi
  4. University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital
  5. University of Calabar Teaching Hospital
  6. Ebonyi State University Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki
  7. University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City
  8. University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu
  9. Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano
  10. Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria
  11. University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin
  12. Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-Araba
  13. Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja
  14. Olabisi Onabanjo (Ogun State) University Teaching Hospital, Sagamu
  15. LAUTECH teaching Hospital, Osogbo
  16. OAU Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife
  17. University College Hospital, Ibadan
  18. Jos University Teaching Hospital
  19. University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital
  20. Usmanu Danfodio University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto
  21. Delta State University Teaching Hospital, Oghara
  22. University of Abuja Teaching Hospital Gwagwalada
  23. Niger Delta University Teaching Hospital, Okolobiri
  24. Benue State University Teaching Hospital Makurdi