Tourism

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Millennium Park, Abuja


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Millennium Park Abuja is the largest public park in Abuja covering, approximately 32 hectares. It is located in the Maitama district of the federal capital territory. The Millennium park was designed by he Italian architect Manfredi Nicoletti,commissioned in December 2003 by Queen Elizabeth II.

Its a lovely place for bird watching, a picnic, walks, jogging, other outdoor and group activities.

Photo Credit: Travel Start Blog

Tourism

Lekki Conservation Centre


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This is definitely a spot to visit while on your elective in Lagos as a group or even by yourself. I went with some lovely friends and we easily arrived at the centre by taxi. The cost of entry and canopy walk is relatively inexpensive N2000 (approximately £4-5/$5-6). We enjoyed the grounds and canopy walk with another group, friendly and informative guides.

The grounds have some beautiful birds including peacocks, we were told the swamp region had snakes, to be honest I was glad I did
not see this! There were many areas we could relax and play  megasized
board games like chess.

I enjoyed the canopy walk the most. The view was beautiful! The canopy is quite high (one of the highest in Africa), so its best to avoid if you have a fear of heights. Always stay hydrated with a bottle of water, although there is a small canteen you can buy some refreshments from.

Also remember to take an extra something in
case it rains, like an umbrella or foldable raincoat – in my case I had neither
and got wet, but the showers didn’t last too long. Also appropriate shoes would be best, otherwise you’ll feel the need to wash your feet at a tap at the end of the walk like we all did! haha

Website: http://www.ncfnigeria.org 

Written by Wumi Oworu

Tourism

Abuja Arts and Craft Village


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This is definitely a spot to visit while on your elective in Abuja or Gwagwalada. After shopping at the at Shoprite in the Central Business District, Abuja, I visited the Abuja Arts and Craft Village, just few minutes walk away.

There are many beautiful authentic, hand crafted jewellery items, small furniture items, baskets, mats, sculptures, pottery, paintings, other art pieces and fashion items which vary in price. This is a great spot to buy for holiday souvenirs and gifts for your loved ones at home. Definitely bring your A game and be ready to bargain!

Written by Wumi Oworu

Elective Reports

Abiola Adeogun – Medical Elective – Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria


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Name: Abiola Adeogun

Country of study: United Kingdom

Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria

Elective Period: 28/03/16 – 22/04/16

Duration of Elective4 weeks

Speciality: Cardiology, Diabetes and Endocrine, Neurology and Respiratory Medicine

 

 

  • What was a typical week like?

A typical week included attending ward rounds and clinics attending occasional teaching with the doctors.

 

 

  • What 3 things did you learn?

1) Making a diagnosis without relying on e.g. imaging and test results.

2) Management of tropical diseases.

3) The structure of the healthcare system in Nigeria.

 

  • What were your most enjoyable moments during your elective?

Being able to go to theatre.

 

  • What similarities and differences did you notice whilst on your elective in Nigeria, in comparison to the healthcare service you have witness whilst at medical school?

Differences in doctor patient relationship, communications skills, organisation and resources.

 

  • What were your goals? Where you able to achieve your goals, and how?

To have a better understanding of healthcare system in Nigeria and be able to compare team dynamics. To identify medical ethical challenges in the hospital and their implications. To explore the possibility of working as a Doctor in Nigeria in the future.

 

  • If you had the opportunity to reorganise or redo your elective, what would you change and why?

I’m really glad that I had the opportunity to work in a state hospital and I have no regrets. If I had to redo my electives, I think I would prefer to work in a smaller hospital or private hospital as I feel I would have been more involved and the experience would have been more hands on. I felt the environment in the state hospital that I worked at was sometimes too busy and lacked organisation.

 

 

 

  • Looking forward, how has your experience impacted your career and personal life?

A lot of communication with patents was in Yoruba. As I don’t understand the language I had trouble following some of the consultations. I realise that if I decide to work in Nigeria in the future, I may need to learn the common languages. My cousin was admitted to a private hospital whilst I was in Nigeria. Visiting her at the private hospital enabled me to see what practicing medicine is like in a private hospital, observe doctor-patient interactions and the general work ethos. I think I would prefer to work in a private hospital in Nigeria in the future.

 

Elective Reports

Wumi Oworu – Medical Elective – University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada, Abuja, Nigeria


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Name: Wumi Oworu

Country of study: United Kingdom

Elective Location: University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada, Abuja, Nigeria

Elective Period: 04/04/16 to 27/05/16

Duration of Elective8 weeks

Speciality: Obstetrics & Gynaecology

 

My experience in Nigeria was a wonderful experience, although I have visited Nigeria several times before, this elective period was my first experience of living in Nigeria independently and working in a healthcare setting. Starting at the beginning, I arrived in Gwagwalada on Monday and met with my supervisor Professor Ekele, who briefly described what was to come while at AUTH. I was introduced to the head of the O&G department and the senior class representative from the University of Abuja Medical school, a young man called Etuk, who assisted me with settling in. Etuk showed me to my accommodation and was kind enough to take me to a few places to buy some food, utensils, etc. My accommodation, was a 2-bedroom flat in a block of flats containing only medical students, I had my own bathroom and I shared the kitchen and living room with my flatmate. The accommodation was a few minutes from the hospital, but still on the hospital grounds. The flat was clean and well kept, with good space and the basics. Later that day I met my flat mate Tolu, who was a lovely young woman in her penultimate year of medical school.

                                           

During my 8 week placement, I was allocated to one team for 4 weeks, where I joined them on their ward rounds, gynaecology clinics, antenatal and post-natal clinics, theatre sessions and on-call duties. Every week day morning began with a morning meeting, cases that were managed the day before were discussed and assessed. I spent 2 weeks in the labour ward, observing and assisting in the management of labour and Caesarean sections. I spent a total of 2 weeks in the gynaecological emergency unit and special care baby unit. During my elective I was taught how to perform vaginal examinations and perform a pelvic examination using a speculum. During antenatal clinics I had the opportunity to examine numerous women at various gestations. I attended to a few patients independently under the supervision of consultants in the gynaecology clinics. I performed investigations such as pap smears, endocervical swabs and high vaginal swabs. I observed cases that are uncommon in the UK, such as large uterine fibroids, primary presentation of metastatic endometrial cancer and the management of labour in a patient with sickle cell disease. I understand the Nigerian Healthcare system consists of both a private sector and national health service insurance scheme, both with their own advantages and disadvantages. The use of traditional medicine also had an impact on health, I often observed patients with advanced disease because they delayed their presentation to the hospital because they sought cheaper traditional alternatives. I had theopportunity to complete a cross-sectional study titled, ‘The Perception of pregnant women about Caesarean section at the University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada’. It consisted of 131 pregnant women presenting to ante-natal clinic. I was granted ethics approval for this study. I used interviewer-assisted structured questionnaire to collect data. The acceptance rate was 70%, other literature quoted acceptance rates of 7-30%. The study showed a higher acceptance rate amongst pregnancy women who were older, married, multiparous, educated and have had a previous Caesarean section. This developed my research skills; it also exposed me to the difficulties of international research such as language barrier and limited resourced such as electricity, internet and time constraints.

                    

 

I enjoyed the food to the absolute maximum, I probably ate grilled catfish at least twice a week and utilised the hospital canteen and ate pounded yam with egusi (my favourite) often. I definitely ate well while in Nigeria. The heat Gwagwalada was a different experience entirely, one I have never experienced before, I learnt to avoid being outdoors between 9am-4pm, to be well stocked up on bottled water and bought a mini-fridge as soon as I arrived (to the manifold wisdom of my mother).

 

                                                 

 

When not working at the hospital, I often enjoyed myself in Abuja with my cousin and the new friends I’d made. I appreciated the order and subtleness of Abuja, in comparison to the hustle of Lagos.

I also had the opportunity to visit Kaduna, which was just a 2 hour drive away from Abuja, or an hour flight from Lagos. I also visited an orphanage a couple of times and gave some assistance.

            

I wish I had taken the opportunity to visit Jos, a popular city known for their cool climate, internationally known for their medical education at the University of Jos, as well as other things. Once my elective was complete, I travelled to Lagos to spend some time with friends and family.

                                      

 

My elective has enriched my undergraduate education, I developed basic obstetric and gynaecological skills which will be useful throughout my career. I have improved my knowledge and skills in maternal and foetal medicine. It has also given me an appreciation for the healthcare system available to patients in the UK. I have experienced another element of medicine that I will always be  grateful for.

My experience has made me more passionate about pursing a medical career in Obstetrics and Gynaecology. It has also exposed me to potential opportunities in the Nigeria, especially for someone like myself – young, ambitious and open-minded.